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The Journey To The Centre Of The Earth — Just How Far Down Have We Gone?

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The journey to the centre of the earth: is this a myth, a story, or is this something that we have done or are in the process of doing? We know about drilling into the Earth’s crust for resources such as fossil fuels, mine shafts that go deep, deep down, and we know, to some degree, about some underground bunkers etc.

But how far into the Earth have we actually gone, and how much has been left undiscovered? We know what science has told us about the composition beyond the Earth’s crust, but what may be surprising for you to know is that we have barely even scratched the Earth’s surface in comparison to what is still waiting to be discovered. After watching the video below, it may leave you questioning whether there may be something to those inner earth theories after all.

After watching this video I was completely floored. I actually remember in Science class being taught about what the Earth is made of: the crust, mantle, inner core, and outer core comprising rock, liquid iron, and solid iron. I asked my teacher how they knew this, and she replied, “oh because they’ve drilled down and have been able to find out.” Of course I just accepted this answer.

I did not realize how impossible that actually would be (drilling down). But now, I’m feeling a bit skeptical, and more so just open to the possibilities of what the Earth might actually be made of.

Now, in no way am I presenting this as fact, but merely something to consider for those of you who enjoy exploring the unlimited possibilities of what could be, despite what mainstream science has led us to believe. No, I’m not about to state a case of the flat earth theory, quite the opposite actually.

Enter, Agartha — The Hollow Earth Theory

There are many theories alluding to an ancient city that lies deep within this Earth’s centre, where either beings once lived or in some theories are still living. It is well known that Hitler himself was fascinated with this theory and made efforts to find the inner earth; there were even maps drawn up that support this claim.
Then there is the story of Operation Hyjump and Admiral Byrd, who apparently flew to the centre of the earth through an opening in the south pole – many believers claim that the entrance to the inner earth is via either the North or South Pole, and interestingly, nowadays, aircraft are prohibited from flying over either of these poles. Once there, he apparently saw lush lakes, greenery, and woolly mammoths, which we all know have been extinct, on the surface of Earth anyways, for thousands of years.

Numerous writers throughout history have been inspired by this story. Creator of Tarzan Edgar Rice BurroughsAt the Earth’s Core, 1914, Edgar Allen Poe The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, 1838 and, most famously, Jules Verne, whose 1864 novel A Journey to the Centre of the Earth has been adapted into film a few times.

There is a huge amount of research and theories that back up this notion, and if you are intrigued by this story I highly suggest looking into it some more. The theory of the inner earth has been tied to many different civilizations throughout our history, and is intriguing to say the least. When you consider the sheer volume of the Earth and how massive it actually is, then it makes it easier to believe in possibilities such as this. At the very least, it’s a very compelling story that has been told for thousands of years.

What do you think of this theory, could it hold some truth? Is it truth? Or is it absolutely, positively impossible? Let us know!

Related CE Article that goes into more detail about one of many lands that might exist within our own, in some way shape or form.

The Legend of Shambhala: A Hidden Land That Exists Within Our Own

Much Love

Source: http://www.collective-evolution.com/2017/11/20/the-journey-to-the-centre-of-the-earth-just-how-far-down-have-we-gone-video/

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